Wilt gets the money, the kids get to see the game. To do this Robert Nozick attacks all forms of patterned theories of justice distribution on three premises which he justifies using the following examples; the Wilt Chamberlain argument, the self-ownership argument and the Kantian argument (Conway). ROBERT NOZICK AND WILT CHAMBERLAIN: HOW PATTERNS PRESERVE LIBERTY Let us now suppose that I have sold the product of my own labour for money, and have used the money to hire a labourer, i.e., I have bought somebody else's labour-power.

Nozick’s Wilt Chamberlain example.

Nozick, after formulating his theory social justice, mostly in rebuttal to John Rawls’ A Theory of Justice, proves through an interesting analogy deemed “The Wilt Chamberlain example” why any “patterned” form of justice will be upset as long as people are free. Entitlement Theory: Our verdicts in the Wilt Chamberlain case align themselves with Nozick’s proposed principles of justice. Nozick was Nozick’s Wilt Chamberlain example.

Bob Nozick’s “famous Wilt Chamberlain argument” was an attempt to argue against the type of government system he described as “distributive justice.” The famous argument appears in Nozick’s first book, Anarchy, State and Utopia in 1974—the book which made the young porfessor a major star. This argument, if successful, would be a considerable challenge for Rawls because his theory … Stephen Metcalf has a must-read essay in Slate about Robert Nozick and the libertarian idea that market outcomes are morally inviolable:. The basic outline of the scenario runs like this: Imagine a world in which all property holdings are uniformly just according to Nozick’s theory of justice in acquisition and justice in transfer. Nozick writes: "Wilt Chamberlain is greatly in … Justice of acquisition: If you acquired something justly, then it is just to own it Explain and assess Nozick's Wilt Chamberlain argument. The Wilt Chamberlain Nozick argument is an attempt to provide redress to the unfair distribution of resources which has historically existed. Criticizing “patterned” theories of justice–that is, those that regard the distribution of resources in society as just only if it fits some preconceived pattern (say, equality)–Nozick asked us to imagine a society that in fact realizes the desired pattern. Nozick writes: "Wilt Chamberlain is greatly in … Presents Robert Nozick's famous Wilt Chamberlain-Argument in a premise/conclusion format. The capitalism Nozick advocates is more pure than the one we have today. In chapter 7 of Nozick’s book, he gives an example of a world where Wilt Chamberlain becomes very rich through voluntary exchange (Nozick 160-162).
Robert Nozick and Wilt Chamberlain: how patterns preserve liberty Robert Nozick occupies the point of view Plekhanov describes, and his Anarchy, State, and Utopia is in good measure an ingenious elaboration of the argument for capitalism that Plekhanov adumbrates.

Unlike Carson, where I disagree with Nozick is his most primary premise: that people undeniably have rights.

Since Robert Nozick blogging is hot now, let me chime in and say that I think Jon Chait and Steven Metcalf have misunderstand what the “Wilt Chamberlain Example” in Anarchy, State, and Utopia is supposed to prove (though arguably so does Jason Kuznicki). Now, in yet another piece of commentary on social justice, I respond to Carson’s post.

Having A wide-ranging thinker, Nozick also made important contributions to epistemology, the problem of personal identity, and decision theory. At the end of the day Wilt is richer and the kids are poorer. Robert Nozick, American philosopher, best known for his rigorous defense of libertarianism in his first major work, Anarchy, State, and Utopia (1974).
Stephen Metcalf has a must-read essay in Slate about Robert Nozick and the libertarian idea that market outcomes are morally inviolable:.

In Robert Nozick’s famed Anarchy,State, and Utopia Nozick uses the example of a basketball player who becomes considerably richer than the rest of the population to demonstrate that liberty is incompatible with any patterned theory of distributive justice. Robert Nozick's Wilt Chamberlain Example Robert Nozick has a famous and highly influential example intended to undermine the case for redistributive taxation based on a thought experiment in which people freely choose to give their money to someone, assuming that they had it justly in the first place, and, given that free, informed choices about distributing one's own money is a …

In Robert Nozick's famed Anarchy, State, and Utopia Nozick uses the example of a baseball player who becomes considerably richer than the rest of the population to show that liberty is incompatible with any patterned theory of distributive justice.

Imagine a society in which the distribution of wealth fits a particular structure or pattern favored by a non-entitlement conception of justice - suppose, to keep things simple, that it is an equal distribution, and call it D1. ASU‘s most famous argument–the “Wilt Chamberlain example”–is also its most misunderstood.